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Julius Kondratyev
Julius Kondratyev

Jesus Under Fire: Modern Scholarship Reinvents ...



The traditional understanding of hell, long held by the vast majority of conservative Christians, is under heavy fire today. Both universalism and annihilationism have made considerable inroads into evangelicalism. Perhaps the best recognized proponent of annihilationism is John R. W. Stott, while the most recent champion of universalism is Rob Bell. There continues to be, therefore, a need for serious and scholarly examination of this subject. Hell Under Fire is just such an examination as nine different authors contribute to this well-written and well-organized book of the afterlife.Al Mohler writes the opening chapter, "Modern Theology: The Disappearance of Hell," which clearly defines and illustrates the modern theological landscape on the subject of hell. This is followed by detailed study of what the Old Testament has to say on hell (Daniel I. Block), what Jesus said (Robert W. Yarbrough), what Paul wrote (Douglas J. Moo) and what the Book of Revelation teaches (Gregory K. Beale). One of the most enlightening sections within these articles is a discussion of the five New Testament texts used by universalists to support their view (pp. 97-102).These discussions are followed with an excellent chapter by Christopher W. Morgan, "Biblical Theology: Three Pictures of Hell," which provide a helpful overview of how each New Testament author views hell (pp. 136-142) and the predominant pictures of hell found in Scripture: punishment, destruction and banishment (pp. 143-151). Robert A. Peterson supplements Morgans chapter by viewing hell from the vantage points of the Trinity, divine sovereignty and human freedom, and the "alreadynot yet" concept.J. I. Packer tackles universalism in chapter eight, showing the various types, why it is gaining in popularity and why it must be rejected biblically. Annihilation is given the same treatment in the following chapter written by Morgan. Sinclair Ferguson concludes the volume with "Pastoral Theology: The Preacher and Hell." His quote of Robert Murray MCheyne to his friend Andrew Bonar, who had just preached on hell, summarizes the chapter well. MCheyne asks his friend, "Did you preach it with tears?" This is a fitting end to ,em>Hell Under Fire. We must know well what the Bible teaches on hell but this knowledge should lead to soft hearts as we recognize, and warn about, the very real dangers of the eternal destiny of the lost.In light of ever increasing pressure to abandon the conservative biblical understanding of hell, both on the scholarly and the popular level, Hell Under Fire is a must read. Gary Gilley, www.ChristianBookPreviews.com




Jesus Under Fire: Modern Scholarship Reinvents ...



And Borg makes no apologies for seeking publicity. "For 30 years, biblical scholarship has been the best-kept secret of modern religion and has not commonly been incorporated in preaching and teaching," he said. Young preachers just out of seminary might try their newfound knowledge on their congregations but "get burned because they are clumsy about presenting it" or back off because of a "vocal minority" in the parish.


The sixteen essays in The Larder argue that the study of food does not simply help us understand more about what we eat and the foodways we embrace. The methods and strategies herein help scholars use food and foodways as lenses to examine human experience. The resulting conversations provoke a deeper understanding of our overlapping, historically situated, and evolving cultures and societies. The Larder presents some of the most influential scholars in the discipline today, from established authorities such as Psyche Williams-Forson to emerging thinkers such as Rien T. Fertel, writing on subjects as varied as hunting, farming, and marketing, as well as examining restaurants, iconic dishes, and cookbooks. Editors John T. Edge, Elizabeth Engelhardt, and Ted Ownby bring together essays that demonstrate that food studies scholarship, as practiced in the American South, sets methodological standards for the discipline. The essayists ask questions about gender, race, and ethnicity as they explore issues of identity and authenticity. And they offer new ways to think about material culture, technology, and the business of food. The Larder is not driven by nostalgia. Reading such a collection of essays may not encourage food metaphors. "It's not a feast, not a gumbo, certainly not a home-cooked meal," Ted Ownby argues in his closing essay. Instead, it's a healthy step in the right direction, taken by the leading scholars in the field.


Although the Blitz has come to symbolize the experience of civilians under attack, Germany first launched air raids on Britain at the end of 1914 and continued them during the First World War. With the advent of air warfare, civilians far removed from traditional battle zones became a direct target of war rather than a group shielded from its impact. This is a study of how British civilians experienced and came to terms with aerial warfare during the First and Second World Wars. Memories of the World War I bombings shaped British responses to the various real and imagined war threats of the 1920s and 1930s, including the bombing of civilians during the Spanish Civil War and, ultimately, the Blitz itself. The processes by which different constituent bodies of the British nation responded to the arrival of air power reveal the particular role that gender played in defining civilian participation in modern war.


Since 1983 David Wharton has photographed the twelve states that define the American South, focusing his attention on rural and small-town culture, vernacular architecture and landscape, the role of religion in Southern life, and the relationship between Southerners, their natural surroundings, and the communities they have built. Small Town South is the result of Wharton's travels through a region that extends from Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas in the west to Virginia and the Carolinas in the east, from Kentucky and Tennessee in the north to Florida in the south, with Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia forming the region's center in between. No other photographer has devoted so much time and attention to recording this distinctive American place. The 115 duotone photographs which serve as the book's core, combined with the author's insightful text, convey an overall sense of what the small Southern town has become and looks like during the early twenty-first century. Wharton organizes his study into thematic portfolios that address themes such as the intersection of tradition and modernity, local commemorations of the past, the omnipresence of the church in town life, the difficulties of making a living in the New World economy, the look of Main Street, the display of public murals and memorials, and the iconographic unfolding of community values. Many have likened Wharton's photographic eye and approach to the work of other photographic masters of the South, including Walker Evans, Eudora Welty, William Christenberry, Shelby Lee Adams, Alex Harris, Rob Amberg, and Martha A. Strawn. And, just as we turn to those artists to help us understand and reckon with Southern history and culture, we now can look to David Wharton as another pioneer photographer of the Southern small town in all its simplicity and complexity.


Employing innovations in media studies, southern cultural studies, and approaches to the global South, this collection of essays examines aspects of the southern imaginary in American cinema and offers fresh insight into the evolving field of southern film studies. In their introduction, Deborah Barker and Kathryn McKee argue that the southern imaginary in film is not contained by the boundaries of geography and genre; it is not an offshoot or subgenre of mainstream American film but is integral to the history and the development of American cinema. Ranging from the silent era to the present and considering Hollywood movies, documentaries, and independent films, the contributors incorporate the latest scholarship in a range of disciplines. The volume is divided into three sections: "Rereading the South" uses new critical perspectives to reassess classic Hollywood films; "Viewing the Civil Rights South" examines changing approaches to viewing race and class in the post-civil rights era; and "Crossing Borders" considers the influence of postmodernism, postcolonialism, and media studies on recent southern films. The contributors to American Cinema and the Southern Imaginary complicate the foundational term "southern," in some places stretching the traditional boundaries of regional identification until they all but disappear and in others limning a persistent and sometimes self-conscious performance of place that intensifies its power. 041b061a72


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